Samal Islands Philippines

Samal Island Physical Profile
Samal Island History
Samal Island Geography
Samal Island Barangays
Getting to Samal Island
Samal Island Map

Samal Island Tourism
Samal Island Features
Samal Natural Wonders
Samal Island Adventures
Samal Island Festivals

Samal Island Accommodations
 
Samal Islands Philippines
Island Garden City of Samal
Samal History


The name Samal was derived from the word Sama, a tribal group found in the island. People used the word Samal because of the Visayans who miscalled the word Sama. The first datu in the island was Datu Taganiyug, a native of Peñaplata, Samal. In the past, the people of Samal name a place about what was the said place known for. For example, the name Peñaplata was derived from the word "piña" or pineapple because of the abundance of pineapple in the area. This, however, is folk etymology as peñaplata literally means "rock of silver" in Spanish. Tagpopongan is the first barangay in Samal which name was from the word "tagpo" or meet.

It was called so because in the past, this place is chose by the datus as their meeting place. The word Samal was also known before because it was commonly used as surname by datus. Abu is the national costume of Samal long time ago. The first business transaction in the island was during the Chinese era. Spanish influence was also felt in the island. The Pacific War was also struck the island. Japanese fighter planes bombed Samal. Japanese occupied the island and forced the people to work for four years until the Philippines expelled the Japanese. After the war, infrastructure was built, like the schools, churches and stores.

The city was created through Republic Act No. 8471 in 1998. This organic act paved the way for the dissolution and merger of the three former-municipalities of Samal, Babak, and Kaputian into one local government unit, now officially named as the Island Garden City of Samal.




Southern Philippine Cuisine

In Mindanao, the southern part of Palawan island, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi, dishes are richly flavored with the spices common to Southeast Asia: turmeric, coriander, lemon grass, cumin, and chillies — ingredients not commonly used in the rest of Filipino cooking. Being free from Hispanicization, the cuisine of the indigenous Moro and Lumad peoples of Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago has much in common with the rich and spicy Malay cuisines of Malaysia and Brunei, as well as Indonesian and Thai cuisines.

More details at Southern Philippine Cuisine


Samal Island Physical Profile, Samal Island History, Samal Island Geography, Samal Island Barangays, Getting to Samal Island, Samal Island Map, Samal Island Tourism, Samal Island Features, Samal Natural Wonders, Samal Island Adventures, Samal Island Festivals, Samal Island Accommodations

Samal Islands Philippines

Samal Islands Philippines - Samal Island Travel Informations


While we strive to present information as accurately as possible,
We are not responsible for any mistakes in information materials, written or any other kind.
All Rights Reserved. Islands Philippines © Copyright -


Managed & Maintained by: Dotnet Business Online Inc.